Types Of Tea in India – 20 Famous Varieties Of Chai

India is a country that is famous for its tea. In fact, it is the second-largest producer of tea in the world, after China. There are many different types of tea that are produced in India, each with its own unique flavour and texture.

Tea cultivation in India began in the 18th century when the British introduced the plant to the country. Since then, it has become an important part of Indian culture and tradition. There are many ways to make tea, but the most popular method is to boil water and add milk and sugar to taste.

There are several different types of tea that are popular in India, such as Assam tea, Darjeeling tea, and Nilgiri tea. Each of these teas has its own unique flavour and aroma.

In this blog post, we will explore some of the most popular varieties of Indian tea. So, sit back and enjoy a cup of steaming hot Indian tea.

Types Of Tea in India

From Assam to Darjeeling, there’s a type of Indian tea for everyone. Below, we’ll explore the different types of tea found in India and their unique flavours. We’ll also discuss how these teas are made and what makes them so unique. So, if you’re interested in learning more about Indian tea, read on!

1. Masala Chai

Masala Chai

Masala chai is a flavoured tea beverage made by brewing black tea with a mixture of aromatic Indian spices and herbs. Originating in India, the beverage has gained worldwide popularity, becoming a feature in many coffee and tea houses.

There are many different recipes for masala chai, with most containing ginger, cardamom, cloves, and pepper. Other common ingredients include cinnamon, star anise, fennel seeds, and black peppercorns. The spice mixture is sometimes brewed with the tea or infused into the hot milk that is used to make the drink.

Masala chai is often served with milk and sugar, although the exact proportions vary depending on personal preference. The drink is usually prepared using black tea leaves, but green or oolong tea can also be used.

It has several purported health benefits, including aiding digestion, relieving cold and flu symptoms, and boosting metabolism. There is no scientific evidence to support these claims, however.

2. Assam Tea

Assam Tea

Assam tea is a type of black tea named after the region of its production, Assam, in India. It is manufactured specifically from the plant Camellia sinensis var. assamica (Masters) and is known for its body, briskness, malty flavour, and strong, bright colour.

This type of tea is grown mostly in the Assam region, as well as in some parts of Bangladesh and Nepal. The climate of this region is tropical, with a monsoon season that lasts from June to September. The region has high humidity and excessive rainfall, which creates the ideal conditions for tea production.

Assam tea is typically harvested from March through May, and again from September through November. The best quality Assam tea is produced during the first flush, which refers to the young leaves and buds that are harvested in early spring. The second flush, which occurs in late spring/early summer, produces a tea that is less full-bodied and has a more astringent flavour.

Assam tea is usually sold as loose-leaf tea, although it is also available in tea bags. It can be enjoyed plain or with milk and sugar.

This drink has several health benefits. It is rich in antioxidants, which can help to protect the body against damage from free radicals. Additionally, Assam tea contains caffeine, which can help to improve mental alertness and focus.

3. Green Tea

Green Tea

Green tea is made from the leaves of Camellia sinensis, a plant native to China and India. The leaves are picked, rolled, and dried before they are brewed into tea.

It is known for its refreshing taste and health benefits. Green tea is rich in antioxidants, which can help protect your cells from damage. It also contains caffeine, which can improve mental alertness and physical performance.

The drink has been shown to boost metabolism and help burn fat. It may also reduce the risk of some diseases, such as cancer and heart disease. If you’re looking for a healthy beverage to enjoy, green tea is a great choice.

4. Butter Tea

Butter Tea

Butter tea, also known as po cha, is a Tibetan and Nepali tea beverage made from tea leaves, yak butter, and water. It is traditionally prepared in a wooden bowl called a tongba and drunk through a bamboo straw.

This tea has a high calorie content due to the addition of yak butter, and is thus consumed as a source of energy, especially by Tibetan herders and manual laborers. It is also believed to have medicinal properties and is sometimes consumed as a sickness remedy.

The taste of butter tea varies depending on the region in which it is prepared, as well as the individual preparer’s preferences. It can range from sweet to salty, and from mild to strong.

The tea can also be made without butter, and sometimes milk or salt are added instead. It is often consumed to relax and unwind, and many people believe that it has health benefits.

5. Kashmiri Kahwa

Kashmiri Kahwa

Kashmiri kahwa is a type of spiced green tea from the Kashmir Valley in the northernmost Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. Kahwa is usually prepared with green tea leaves, cardamom, cloves, cinnamon and sometimes saffron. It is traditionally served in special occasions and celebrations.

The drink has a strong, distinct flavour that is often compared to Indian masala chai. The tea is traditionally brewed with green tea leaves, but black tea leaves can also be used. Kashmiri kahwa is usually sweetened with sugar or honey, and sometimes milk is added as well.

Kashmiri kahwa is typically served in small cups or glasses, and is often garnished with almonds, pistachios, or saffron strands. It is a popular winter drink in the Kashmir Valley and is often consumed to help keep warm during the cold months. The tea is also believed to have many health benefits, including boosting immunity, aiding digestion, and reducing stress levels.

6. Noon Chai

Noon Chai

Noon chai or Sheer chai is a milky tea popular in the Kashmir Valley, India. It is made with green tea leaves, milk, salt, and baking soda. The name comes from the Persian word for milk, shir, and the Hindi word for tea, chai.

Noon chai has a creamy texture and a sweet-salty taste. It is traditionally made in a brass pot and served in small ceramic cups. This chai is usually drunk in the afternoon, after lunch. It is often served with snacks such as biscuits or cake.

This drink is believed to have health benefits, such as helping to keep the body warm and promoting digestion. If you are visiting the Kashmir Valley, be sure to try a cup of noon chai.

7. Nilgiri Tea

Nilgiri Tea

Nilgiri tea, or blue mountain tea, is a type of black tea grown in the Nilgiri hills of Tamil Nadu, India. The leaves are usually rolled into small pellets before being dried and oxidized. This results in a brew that is full-bodied with notes of floral and citrus.

This tea is best brewed using water that has been freshly boiled and allowed to cool for a few minutes. This will help to extract the maximum flavour from the leaves. Brewed Nilgiri tea should be allowed to cool slightly before being enjoyed so that the full range of flavours can be appreciated.

It tea is a delicious and refreshing beverage that is perfect for any time of day. Whether you are looking to relax after a long day or wake up with a cup of tea, Nilgiri tea is the perfect choice.

8. Darjeeling Tea

Darjeeling Tea

Darjeeling tea is a tea made from the Camellia sinensis plant that is grown in the Darjeeling region of India. It is usually processed as black tea but can also be processed into green and oolong teas. The flavour of Darjeeling tea is often described as muscatel or having a fruity and flowery aroma.

The tea is grown at high altitudes, which contributes to its unique flavour. Darjeeling tea is produced in limited quantities and is considered to be a premium tea. It is often sold as whole leaves, rather than in tea bags.

It has a long history, dating back to the early 1800s when it was first planted in the Darjeeling region. The tea quickly became popular among British colonists and was soon being exported to England. In 1839, the British East India Company took control of the region and began mass-producing the tea. Darjeeling tea continued to grow in popularity, and by the late 1800s it was one of the most popular teas in England.

Today, Darjeeling tea is still popular, and is produced in small quantities each year. It is typically more expensive than other types of tea, due to its limited availability.

If you’re looking for a unique and flavourful tea, Darjeeling is a great option. It’s perfect for those who enjoy black tea but want something with a bit more character. It’s also a good choice for those who are looking for a tea with health benefits, as it is rich in antioxidants.

9. White Tea

White Tea

White tea is a lightly oxidized tea grown and harvested primarily in China. It is classified into two main types, Wei tea and Baihao tea, depending on the processing method. The leaves of white tea are picked before they are fully opened, when the buds are still covered with fine white hair. White teas generally have a light yellow or pale green colour and a delicate, slightly sweet flavour.

While white tea is made from the same plant as green and black tea, Camellia sinensis, it is processed differently. White tea leaves are allowed to wither in natural sunlight or in a controlled environment before they are gently rolled and dried. This minimal processing results in a tea with very little oxidation and a higher concentration of antioxidants.

There are many different types of white tea, but some of the most popular include Silver Needle, White Peony, and Dragon Well. Silver Needle is made from only the buds of the tea plant, while White Peony is made from buds and leaves. Dragon Well is a type of green tea, but it is produced in a similar way to white tea and has a similar flavour.

10. Oolong Tea

Oolong Tea

Oolong tea is a partially oxidized tea made from the Camellia sinensis plant, a species of evergreen shrub or small tree whose leaves and leaf buds are used to produce tea. It is among the most popular teas in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and many parts of Southeast Asia, as well as being widely consumed in South Asia and the Middle East. It can be processed in a wide variety of ways and produces teas with differing taste, colour, and aroma.

The taste of oolong tea can vary widely depending on the region where it is produced, the methods used to process it, and other factors. It can range from sweet and floral to rich and roasted, with many different types in between. Oolong tea is often described as being somewhere between green tea and black tea in taste.

Oolong teas are usually classified according to how much they have been oxidized. The level of oxidation can range from 8–85%, with most teas falling somewhere in the middle. The more oxidized a tea is, the darker its leaves and liquor will be, and the more intense its flavour will be.

11. Black Tea

Black Tea

Black tea is a type of tea that is more oxidized than oolong, green, and white teas. It is generally stronger in flavour than the less oxidized teas. Brewed black tea typically has a higher caffeine content than other tea types. A cup of brewed black tea contains about 42 milligrams of caffeine, while a cup of green tea only has about 28 milligrams.

This tea has several health benefits. Studies have shown that black tea can help reduce the risk of stroke, heart disease, and cancer. It also contains antioxidants that can help protect the body against damage from free radicals.

12. Herbal Tea

Herbal Tea

Herbal tea, also called tisane, is any beverage made from the infusion or decoction of herbs, spices, or other plant material in hot water. There are many kinds of herbal tea available commercially. Chamomile, ginger, lavender, and peppermint are some of the most popular herbs used to make tea.

Herbal teas can be made with fresh or dried herbs, and they can be brewed with just a small amount of herb material or a large amount. The strength of the tea will also vary depending on how long it is steeped.

They are generally considered to be safe for most people to drink. However, as with any kind of tea, it is important to check with a healthcare provider before drinking herbal tea if you have any medical conditions or are taking any medications. Some herbs can interact with medications, and some people may be allergic to certain herbs.

Herbal teas can be enjoyed hot or cold, and they can be sweetened with honey or other natural sweeteners. They can also be flavoured with fruit juices, spices, or other flavourings.

13. Rooibos Tea

Rooibos Tea

Rooibos tea is an herbal tea made from the leaves of the “red bush” plant, Aspalathus linearis. It is native to South Africa and is commonly consumed there. Rooibos tea has several health benefits, including reducing stress, boosting immunity, and preventing aging.

It is rich in antioxidants, which help to protect the body against damage from free radicals. The tea is also a good source of minerals, including iron, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. These minerals are essential for maintaining health and preventing diseases.

Rooibos tea has also been shown to be effective in reducing stress and anxiety. Studies have shown that it can help to lower blood pressure and heart rate, and to improve sleep quality. It is also thought to boost the immune system and have anti-aging properties.

14. Yerba Mate

Yerba Mate

Yerba mate is a traditional South American herbal tea made from the leaves of the yerba mate plant. It is rich in antioxidants and nutrients and has been shown to offer a variety of health benefits, including improved mental focus and decreased fatigue. It is traditionally consumed from a gourd (calabash) with a metal straw (bombilla) but can also be brewed like regular tea.

This tea contains caffeine, which can improve mental focus and increase energy levels. It also contains a range of vitamins and minerals, including vitamins A, C, and E, as well as potassium, magnesium, and iron. Yerba mate has been shown to boost the immune system, improve digestion, and promote weight loss. Additionally, it has been linked with reduced risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.

The tea is typically served with sugar or honey and lime. It can also be enjoyed plain or flavoured with mint, citrus, or other fruits.

15. Blooming Tea

Blooming Tea

Blooming tea is a type of tea made by stitching together tea leaves and flowers. The result is a tea that not only has a beautiful appearance, but also a unique flavour.

It is often made with green or white tea leaves, as these types of tea tend to be more delicate and allow the flavours of the flowers to shine through. However, there is no reason why you couldn’t experiment with other types of tea leaves to see what you like best.

When it comes to the flowers, there are many different options to choose from. Some of the most popular include chrysanthemums, jasmine, and hibiscus. You can also use a mixture of different flowers to create your own unique blend.

16. Yellow Tea

Yellow Tea

Yellow tea is a type of Chinese tea that is grown in the same regions as green tea. The difference between the two teas is in the processing; yellow tea undergoes a slower oxidation process than green tea. This results in a mellower flavour and a slightly more yellow colour.

This tea is not as well-known as green or black tea, but it is starting to become more popular as people learn about its health benefits. Yellow tea contains the same antioxidants as green tea, but it also has a unique antioxidant called EGCG. This compound has been shown to boost metabolism and protect against cell damage.

Yellow tea is a great choice for those who want to enjoy the benefits of green tea without the strong flavour. It is also a good option for those who are sensitive to caffeine. The tea has a moderate amount of caffeine, so it will not keep you up at night like coffee or energy drinks.

17. Lemongrass Tea

Lemongrass Tea

Lemongrass tea has a light, citrusy flavour that is refreshing and invigorating. It is rich in antioxidants and has many health benefits, including promoting digestion, relieving anxiety, and boosting the immune system.

Lemongrass is a tropical plant that is native to Southeast Asia. The stalks of the plant are used to make lemongrass tea. It has a light, citrusy flavour and is rich in antioxidants. It has many other health benefits, including promoting digestion, relieving anxiety, and boosting the immune system.

18. Irani Chai

Irani Chai

Irani Chai is a type of tea which is very popular in India and Pakistan. It is made with a special kind of tea called Assam tea, which has a strong flavour. The tea is then mixed with milk and sugar to make it more palatable. It is usually brewed for a longer time than normal tea, to allow the flavours to develop fully.

Irani Chai is traditionally served in small glasses and is often accompanied by snacks such as biscuits or cakes. It is a popular drink to have during celebrations or special occasions.

19. Tandoori Chai

Tandoori Chai

Tandoori Chai is a type of spiced tea made in a clay pot. It is very popular in Indian restaurants and is usually served with food.

The word “tandoori” refers to the clay pot in which the tea is brewed, and “chai” simply means “tea” in Hindi. This spiced tea is made by simmering tea leaves, milk, water, and spices in a tandoori pot. The most common spices used in tandoori chai are cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and black pepper.

Tandoori chai has a very strong flavour and is often served with food to help balance out the spices. It is also very popular in the winter months, as the spices can help warm you up. If you’re looking to try something new and different, tandoori chai is definitely worth a try.

20. Kangra Tea

Kangra Tea

Kangra tea is one of the most popular teas from India. It is grown in the Kangra district of Himachal Pradesh, in the foothills of the Himalayas. The region has a long history of tea production, and the tea is known for its light, flowery flavour.

The tea is typically made from a blend of Assam and Darjeeling teas, giving it a unique flavour that is both light and refreshing. The light, flowery flavour is perfect for afternoon tea, and the region’s long history of tea production means that you can be sure of its quality. Whether you enjoy it with milk and sugar or on its own, Kangra tea is a great choice for any tea lover.

Conclusion

There are many different types of tea available, and each one has its own unique flavour. Whether you’re looking for a light and refreshing tea or a strong and flavourful tea, there’s sure to be a type of tea that suits your taste. So why not try something new and explore the world of tea today?

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